13 October: International Day for Disaster Reduction

15 October 2018

Disasters induced by natural and technological hazards affect millions of people every year worldwide, but much of their impact can be reduced through pro-active measures and planning. The International Day for Disaster Reduction, held each year on 13 October, celebrates how people and communities around the world are reducing their exposure to disasters.

UNESCO is engaged in the conceptual shift in thinking away from post-disaster reaction and towards pre-disaster action, and helps countries build their capacities in managing disaster and climate risk.

This years theme is Reducing disaster economic losses in relation to global gross domestic product by 2030. In 2017 alone, 9,000 lives were lost and 96 million people were affected by disasters due to floods, wildfires and earthquakes, causing 270 billion in combined losses it was the second costliest year on record in terms of damages caused by natural hazards. The 2018 International Day for Disaster Reduction focuses on diminishing the economic impact of disasters worldwide. The commemoration will provide an advocacy platform to highlight the economic consequences of failure to manage disaster risk, particularly for vulnerable groups in low and middle-income countries. Join the conversation with the hashtags #IDDR2018 #ResilienceForAll

Message from the Director-General of UNESCO

Mitigation of the effects of disasters and investment in preventive actions have a positive impact on economies at the local, national and global levels. Let us then join forces to support Member States in implementing this strategy.

Audrey Azoulay, Director-General of UNESCO. Message on the occasion of the International Day for Disaster Reduction 2018

- Full message
English | Russian

Read also a major report released by UNISDR and focusing on economic losses from disasters: UN 20-year review: Economic Losses, Poverty & Disasters
sustainable-science

Permanent link: http://en.unesco.kz/international-day-for-disaster-reduction